Disc Golf Terms

Hyzer- Used to describe a type of shot when the disc is released with the wing down.  This creates a very hard curve to the left for a right handed back hand thrower (RHBH), or a hard curve to the right for a left handed backhand thrower (LHBH).  This shot allows players to really rip into the disc and put full power on the throw without worrying about flipping the disc over.

This is how you would release the disc for a hyzer flight.

This is how you would release the disc for a hyzer flight.

Anhyzer- Used to describe a type of shot when the disc is released with the wing up.  This creates a curve to the right for a right handed back hand thrower, or a curve to the left for a left handed backhand thrower.  This shot allows players to counter the natural tendencies of the disc.  This shot is most effective with an under stable disc.

This is how you would throw a disc with an anhyzer flight.

This is how you would throw a disc with an anhyzer flight.

S-curve- This describes the flight path of a disc when thrown with slight anhyzer.  The disc will start out flying to the right for a RHBH thrower and then finish fading left.  This shot allows players to increase their distance and to curve around objects.

Stable- This describes how the disc will fly.  A stable disc will have a tendency to fly straight and to finish with little to no fade.

Over stable- This describes how the disc will fly.  An over stable disc will have a tendency to fly straight and finish hard to the left for a RHBH thrower or hard to the right for a LHBH thrower.

Under stable- This describes how the disc will fly.  An under stable disc will have a tendency to fly straight and finish to the right for a RHBH thrower or to the left for a LHBH thrower.

Turnover- Used to describe the amount of anhyzer and or power a player puts on their throw.  When a player turns their drive over, normally the disc will cut hard into the ground and either skip, roll, or die.

Innova Flight Chart- It seems as though no company ever uses the same flight chart/system to rate their discs.  Innova has four different boxes/numbers to describe the flight of their discs.

  • Speed- this is the disc’s ability to cut through the air and how fast it can fly.  The numbers range from a 1 all the way to a 13!  The lower numbers, 1-5, are going to be your mid ranges and putters.  The next level will be the fairway drivers, 6&7.  Finally you get your distance drivers, 8-13.
  • Glide- this is the disc’s ability to maintain loft.  The numbers range from 1-7.  The lower numbers will drop out of the air faster, leaving you less chance the disc will sail past the basket.  The discs with higher glide ratings are best for new players or players looking to get more distance out of their throws.
  • Turn- This is the discs ability to turn to the right for a RHBH thrower during the fastest part of its flight.  The rating scale is from -5 to +1.  The lower the number, the more the disc will turn.  Discs with a low number make it easier for players to get a distance increasing S curve out of their throw.  The discs with number -3 through -5 are the easiest to throw roller shots with.
  • Fade- This is the discs ability to cut to the left for a RHBH thrower or cut to the right for a LHBH thrower as the disc slows down during flight.  It is based on a 0-5 rating scale with a 0 finishing straight, and a 5 will finish hard to the right for a RHBH thrower.  New players should look for discs that have a fade around 0.

Discraft Flight Chart- Just about every Discraft disc has the stability stamped on it.  Their scale ranges from a -1 to a 2.6.  The numbers from -1 to 0 are on the under stable to stable range, numbers 0 to 1.5 are the stable discs, and numbers 1.5 to 2.6 are in the stable to over stable category.  Their flight chart takes each disc and lists the stability of that disc in each plastic, if it is made in the 150 class, if it’s a good wind disc, if it’s a good roller disc, and if its beginner friendly.  On the side of the chart, they break down the types of plastics and their advantages.

Disc Weights- Disc weights will max out at about 180 g.  As far as disc weights go, the lighter discs are easier for new players.  New players will benefit from the lighter discs because the lighter the disc, it is generally going to be on the under stable side of that discs flight characteristics.  I’m not saying that you can get a brand new disc that is rated to be as over stable as a Predator in 150 g and be flipping it over from the first throw.  I just mean that when thrown, the disc will stay on a stable and straight flight path for longer.  The lighter weights also are easier to throw because it is less mass that you have to accelerate to throw, allowing you to get greater speed and rotation on the disc.  This could allow you to get that sought after S curve on the flight of your drive.  There are discs in a super light weight class called the 150 g class.  These discs will be best for children, women, or anyone with a weaker arm.  These are some of the lightest discs out there and will truly give you the distance and accuracy you want when just starting out.  Pro players and players with a lot of power tend to throw max weight discs or discs that are near max weight due to the fact that they can really power that extra mass for extra distance.

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